Do You Want Allergy-Free Milk For Your Baby?

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Cow's milk

With 2-3 percent of infants in developed nations being allergic to cows' milk during the first year of their lives, what other option do they have but to be fed allergy-free milk. This may have sounded like a stretch of imagination a few years ago but a team of researchers in New Zealand has achieved a breakthrough in this regard. The allergy-free milk is not a possibility and, therefore, there is hope for the kids who cannot drink the usual cow's milk or whose mothers prefer not to breastfeed.

 

Who said Genetically Modified substances are always bad for health? Thanks to some smart GM technique, the New Zealand scientists have used a process called RNA interference to produce milk with very little of the allergy-causing protein. Since the cow's milk is different in composition to the mother's milk, babies sometime face allergic reaction if they are fed the cow's milk during the initial days of birth. The scientific procedure used by the scientists helps in reducing the allergic quotient of the cow's milk, thereby, increasing its suitability for infants.

 

A paper in this case was published in the journal "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences", and the team of scientists led by Anower Jabed has made it clear that with their process, they were able to produce  genetically modified cow's milk, which showed 96% less chances to cause allergic reactions.

 

This is the first time that RNA interference is shown to be working in livestock and with this GM cow's milk, the infants allergic to normal milk definitely have some hope for sustenance.

 

 

Image Courtesy: redicecreations 

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