Sugary Drinks Can Increase Risk Of Gout

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If you are one among the thousands of people who reach for a sugary drink when you are thirsty you may want to re-think that option. A 22-year study has revealed that people who take in one sugary soda per day were 74% likely to be susceptible to Gout. What the doctors are saying is sugary drinks can increase the risk of gout and the more a person consumes higher his chances having it.


What is gout? Gout is an inflammatory condition caused by elevated levels of uric acid in the blood that gets deposited in the joints.


The Study in women: The studies not only include sugary sodas but also orange juice. Men are mostly susceptible to this but women older than 70 are also likely to be at risk too. The studies were conducted by Dr. Hyon Choi of Boston University and were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Choi and colleagues looked for associations between sugary drinks and intake in 79,000 participants who did not have any baseline symptoms of gout. 778 women were diagnosed with gout. They also took into consideration body mass index (BMI), hypertension, age, and menopause and found a significant co-relation between the two.


Orange juice consumption everyday put the risk at 41% higher for gout incidence and 142% if they had it twice daily. They explained that fructose unlike other sugars increased the uric acid levels.


 Sugar sweetened drinks lead to not just gout but diabetes too and are best avoided. The simple procedure of peeling oranges and drinking the squeezed juice, with its natural sugars are less detrimental than added sugars and flavors. Nutritional guidelines issued have suggested that sugary drinks should be limited to one eight-ounce serving per day even for healthy kids.


Childhood obesity being at an alarming rate sweetened sodas and health drinks with empty calories should be limited to minimum. There is nothing healthier than a glass of water for adults and children.


For more information refer to JAMA article


Image credit: ifood.tv

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